Refashioning a vintage blouse, with a bit of guilt!

 

This is a story, where I did feel a bit guilty, but I also managed to save a lovely piece of vintage fabric, so I’m sticking to that as my justification. This vintage blouse was lovely as it was. It was bought by my daughter at one of the vintage fairs in Edinburgh. What we hadn’t noticed was the holes in the underarms, not just at the seams, but around the whole area. Not so nice! And a hazard of this type of shopping!

Fortunately the blouse was in a larger size than both of us, so it still had potential. I had tried reinserting the sleeves, minus the worn fabric areas, but the entire top was still too big and, for me, and it was shorter than I would normally wear. If I still wore high waisted trousers or skirts, and I mean when the waistbands that were cut on the straight grain and sat above the natural waistline, I would have kept this top in this styling for myself, because I think it is lovely, but since waistlines are lower, it would never have been worn!

The sleeves, and therefore the armholes, were so deep that I wasn’t sure if there would be enough fabric to reshape the sides, but luckily the front and back body pieces were wide enough for me to be able to move the side seams over and make the armholes the correct size.

I unpicked the waistband and buckle. I remade these into a self fabric matching belt and reused the buttons.

I used the sleeves to cut out bias binding strips for my new sleeveless armholes and cut out flared pieces to attach to the hem edge of the top, making it into a far better length for me. I had hacked the Sewoverit vintage shirt dress pattern into a top a while back, so I used the skirt pattern pieces minus the tucks, and further shortened it to 12cm.

Should I feel guilt free? Guilt gone! Originally it was a beautiful style of top, in such a pretty print, but with so much damage and being far too big, I’m glad I took the time to make it into something that can be worn again.

 

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24 thoughts on “Refashioning a vintage blouse, with a bit of guilt!

  1. love it love it love it!- and what an infinitely more wearable and summery piece – I adore the belt buckle – and I think placing it within the blouse as opposed to at the base in the original makes it a finer feature. truly lovely

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  2. Linda, I like it better after the refashioning. Just more my style I guess. As always a beautiful re-make.

    Of course being RUDE Girl, and if the blouse had been rescued from landfill, I would have hacked of the sleeves, and left a raw edge. Possibly used boro mending for any holes LOL. Shocking, I know!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The problem with vintage fairs is that the prices are high. So if I buy from there I expect the clothing to be wearable as it is! I was really surprised at how horrible the underarms were on this blouse. My daughter refused to wear it after buying it and I loved bits of it enough to remake it. Now I’m going to wear it, if it ever gets warm enough!!!

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      1. I thought they were expensive too when I went. Loads of the nice dresses were already home made but had issues so I couldn’t bring myself to pay money for something that was old, homemade and needed fixing. Kudos to you for seeing between the lines

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Absolutely adore how this refashion worked out. Someone above commented that they can’t “see” the potential in a remake- I’m kind of the same way, to be honest. I like constructing from scratch– the idea of reworking is still super puzzling to me! But, I think being able to squeeze out more wear out of this top is absolutely stellar. I would wear this all the time! Great job.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Gorgeous remodel! I much prefer it to the original. It’s such a lovely print. I know it seems like sacrilege to cut up an original vintage piece but I think you are absolutely right.to make a wearable garment from an unwearable one.

    Liked by 1 person

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